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Reinhard Hagen
Bass

Reinhard Hagen was born in Bremen and studied at the Musikhochschule in Karlsruhe. He was a member of the Deutsche Oper troupe in Berlin, where he performed numerous roles including Pogner (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg), Landgrave (Tannhäuser), Daland (Der fliegende Holländer), King Heinrich (Lohengrin), Fasolt and Hunding (The Ring Cycle), Sarastro (Die Zauberflöte), Arkel (Pelléas et Mélisande), and Kaspar (Der Freischütz). He has made guest appearances at the Glyndebourne Festival and the Théâtre du Châtelet (Rocco in Fidelio with Sir Simon Rattle conducting), the Paris Opera (Sarastro), the Gran Teatre del Liceu in Barcelona (Sarastro, King Heinrich), London’s Royal Opera House Covent Garden (the Commendatore in Don Giovanni), New York’s Metropolitan Opera (the King in Aida, Sarastro), the Malmö Opera (Gurnemanz in Parsifal), the Salzburg Festival (Rocco), the Bayreuth Festival (King Heinrich), as well as in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Munich. More recently, he played Gurnemanz at the Athens Opera, Daland at the Hamburg Staatsoper, Daland again for a concert version in Korea, King Heinrich in Oman, King Marke (Tristan und Isolde) in Warsaw, Fasolt (Das Rheingold—first in concert with Sir Mark Elder and the Hallé Orchestra and then at the Berlin Staatsoper), Pistola (Falstaff) at the San Diego Opera, and the Sprecher (Die Zauberflöte) and Titurel at the Berlin Staatsoper. Reinhard Hagen has performed in concert with some of the great symphony orchestras under the direction of numerous conductors including Claudio Abbado, Herbert Blomstedt, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Marek Janowski, Lorin Maazel, Kurt Masur, Wolfgang Sawallisch, and Christian Thielemann. He makes regular guest appearances with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra with whom he has sung the role of Hunding under the baton of Sir Simon Rattle and Claudio Abbado, and that of Titurel in a concert version of Parsifal conducted by Sir Simon Rattle.

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