© Patrick Tourneboeuf / Tendance Floue / OnP

Dates / Prix

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Opéra Bastille - First performance on 2 June 2014 - 7:30PM

Ticket rates : 5€, 15€, 35€, 70€, 100€, 130€, 150€, 180€, 195€

Running time : 2H47 with 2 intervals

June 2014
Mon
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19:30
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19:30
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19:30
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19:30
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19:30
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19:30
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19:30
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19:30
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*5 juin : gala Arop – tarifs et réservations uniquement pour cette date : 01 58 18 65 10 / www.arop-opera.com

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NEW PRODUCTION
La Traviata
Giuseppe Verdi
Book
Presentation
Pre-performance reading
OPERA IN THREE ACTS (1853)
MUSIC BY GIUSEPPE VERDI (1813-1901)
LIBRETTO BY FRANCESCO MARIA PIAVE BASED ON ALEXANDRE DUMAS FILS'S PLAY "LA DAME AUX CAMÉLIAS"
Performed in Italian

“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
Following on from Werther, Benoît Jacquot directs Diana Damrau in this other opera about love and sacrifice.

Daniel Oren (2, 5, 7, 9 et 20 june) Conductor
Francesco Ivan Ciampa (12, 14, 17 june) Conductor
Benoît Jacquot Stage director
Sylvain Chauvelot Sets
Christian Gasc Costumes
André Diot Lighting
Patrick Marie Aubert Chorus master
ArtisteNoteRôle
Diana Damrau
Violetta Valéry
Anna Pennisi
Flora Bervoix
Cornelia Oncioiu
Annina
Francesco Demuro
Alfredo Germont
Ludovic Tézier
Giorgio Germont
Kevin Amiel
Gastone
Fabio Previati
Il Barone Douphol
Igor Gnidii
Il Marchese d’Obigny
Nicolas Testé
Dottore Grenvil
Paris Opera Orchestra and Chorus

axaAXA FRANCE, SPONSOR OF LA TRAVIATA

 

 
 
  
     
 

Sponsor of the Paris Opera’s live broadcasts


international tv distributor for Opéra national de Paris

Live in cinemas on 17 June / To be broadcast at a later date on France Télévisions
Live on France Musique and uer on 7 June

The composer

Giuseppe Verdi was born in 1813 in Le Roncole, a hamlet near Busetto, and died in Milan in 1901. He composed around thirty operas. Amongst the most famous are Nabucco, Ernarni, Attila, Macbeth, Luisa Miller, Rigoletto, Il Trovatore, La Traviata, I Vespri siciliani, Un Ballo in maschera, La Forza del destino, Don Carlo, Aïda, Otello and Falstaff. He also wrote a Requiem Mass. He gradually abandoned classic bel canto in order to develop a greater intensity of vocal expression. Verdi’s later works see the disappearance of recitative and the advent of continuous musical argument.

The work

Piave’s libretto is inspired by Alexandre Dumas’play La Dame aux camélias (1852), itself drawn from his semi-autobio­gra­p­hical novel, based on the life of Alphonsine Duplessis, the famous Parisian demi-mondaine, who died of tuberculosis in 1847. The opera was a fiasco when it was first performed at La Fenice in 1853, above all because of a mediocre cast. In addition, the audience may have been nonplussed by Verdi’s innova­tive musical language. For the first time the composer took as a subject for an opera the literature of his times and abandoned all historical context depicting ordinary life in the search for inner emotion and psychological realism. It is true that there are still arias and cabalettas and the party scenes in the first and second acts are written in a brilliant and spirited style, but in the intimate scenes the music turns its back on the vocal virtu­osity which was still in vogue at the time and uses half shades. Violetta’s arias are tinged with an air of interiority, which marvel­lously expresses the inner strength of the character. Verdi had never before interested himself to such an extent in the pyschological development of one of his heroines : nascent love, passion, suffering and sacrifice are depicted with great precision. Censorship at that time would not allow the work to be performed in contemporary costumes, so the action was transposed to the times of Louis XIV. It was only in 1906 that La Traviata was first performed in nineteenth-century costumes. After its disastrous creation, the opera was revived at the Teatro San Benedetto in Venice, this time with a cast which met the composer’s requirements. Verdi had reworked the score for the occasion and the work was the triumphal success it has remained. Today La Traviata is Verdi’s most popular opera.

The first performance

The first version of La Traviata was first performed at La Fenice in Venice on 6 March 1853, the reworked version at the Teatro San Benedetto on 5 May 1854. The first perfor­mance in France was at the Théâtre Italien on 6 December 1856.

The work at the Paris Opera

La Traviata was first performed at the Palais Garnier on 24 December 1926 with Fanny Heldy in the role of Violetta and Georges Thill in the role of Alfredo. The many inter­pre­ters of the work have included Janine Micheau, Renée Doria, Jacqueline Brumaire, Andréa Guiot, Katia Ricciarelli, Cecilia Gasdia (Violetta), Beniamino Gigli, Nicolaï Gedda, Alain Vanzo, Alberto Cupido, Giacomo Aragall (Alfredo), Ernest Blanc, Robert Massard, Louis Quilico, Gabriel Bacquier and Leo Nucci (Germont). La Traviata was presented at the Opera Bastille for the first time in December 1997, in a production by Jonathan Miller, with Angela Gheorgiu, Ramon Vargas and Alexandru Agache, under the direction of James Conlon. In 2007, a new production staged byu Christoph Marthaler was presented at the Palais Garnier, under the direction of Sylvain Cambreling and with Christine Schäfer, Jonas Kaufmann and José Van Dam.