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Convergences

Jeudis de Bastille
 

Booking

FOR CONCERTS

  • - by internet (tickets dispatched 14 days before the concert date. Beyond this date, tickets should be collected from the Studio.)
  • - At the box-offices of the Opéra Bastille or the Palais Garnier (no tickets may be purchased at the Studio).

FOR OTHER EVENTS

  • - we recommend you book your seats. In case of unavailability on the internet site, one hundred seats will be distributed when doors open.

Access

Entrance via the grand exterior stairway of the Opéra Bastille.
Presence required 30 minutes before the beginning of the event.

Prices

Concerts : 5€
Conferences and encounters: no charge, subject to availability.

Every Thursday, the Paris Opera invites you to a lunchtime event. It may be a discussion or a talk or a concert by the musicians of the Opera Orchestra or Chorus.

> See past events

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

30 June 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 5 July 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 July 2014 - 2:30PM, 15 July 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 July 2014 - 7:30PM
Notre-Dame de Paris

Created in 1965, Roland Petit's first production for the Opera Ballet, Notre Dame de Paris,is an intense work. With his highly developed sense of theatricality and his taste for dramatic stories, Roland Petit took up Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece: around the four principal characters, Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo and Phoebus, a tragic story of love and death is played out, in which beauty rubs shoulders with the grotesque, and humanity and innocence come up against hatred and jealousy. Yves Saint Laurent's first ever costume designs with their vivid colours like so many stained glass windows; the imposing backdrop of the majestic cathedral, and Maurice Jarre's original music all contribute to the success of this grand Medieval fresco.

1 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 September 2014 - 2:30PM
Tanztheater Wuppertal

The Tanztheater Wuppertal, which has just celebrated its fortieth anniversary, returns to the stage of the Palais Garnier with Two Cigarettes in the Dark. First performed in 1985 and inspired by the title of a Bing Crosby song evoking solitude and the loss of a loved one, this piece is an example of the “dance theatre” so characteristic of Pina Bausch’s work. In a box-like set of pristine white conceived by Peter Pabst, the dancers interact, crossing paths and following on from each other in violent and burlesque sequences, thus attempting to fill the emptiness of their existences. Situated between tragedy and derision, suffering and hope, the tableaux dovetail into each other, revealing the complexity of the relationships between men and women and the contradictions of human nature. A rare and incisive piece, Two Cigarettes in the Dark raises questions about the theatre of life.

Book
1 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 September 2014 - 2:30PM
Tanztheater Wuppertal

The Tanztheater Wuppertal, which has just celebrated its fortieth anniversary, returns to the stage of the Palais Garnier with Two Cigarettes in the Dark. First performed in 1985 and inspired by the title of a Bing Crosby song evoking solitude and the loss of a loved one, this piece is an example of the “dance theatre” so characteristic of Pina Bausch’s work. In a box-like set of pristine white conceived by Peter Pabst, the dancers interact, crossing paths and following on from each other in violent and burlesque sequences, thus attempting to fill the emptiness of their existences. Situated between tragedy and derision, suffering and hope, the tableaux dovetail into each other, revealing the complexity of the relationships between men and women and the contradictions of human nature. A rare and incisive piece, Two Cigarettes in the Dark raises questions about the theatre of life.

Book
1 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 September 2014 - 2:30PM
Tanztheater Wuppertal

The Tanztheater Wuppertal, which has just celebrated its fortieth anniversary, returns to the stage of the Palais Garnier with Two Cigarettes in the Dark. First performed in 1985 and inspired by the title of a Bing Crosby song evoking solitude and the loss of a loved one, this piece is an example of the “dance theatre” so characteristic of Pina Bausch’s work. In a box-like set of pristine white conceived by Peter Pabst, the dancers interact, crossing paths and following on from each other in violent and burlesque sequences, thus attempting to fill the emptiness of their existences. Situated between tragedy and derision, suffering and hope, the tableaux dovetail into each other, revealing the complexity of the relationships between men and women and the contradictions of human nature. A rare and incisive piece, Two Cigarettes in the Dark raises questions about the theatre of life.

Book
1 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 September 2014 - 2:30PM
Tanztheater Wuppertal

The Tanztheater Wuppertal, which has just celebrated its fortieth anniversary, returns to the stage of the Palais Garnier with Two Cigarettes in the Dark. First performed in 1985 and inspired by the title of a Bing Crosby song evoking solitude and the loss of a loved one, this piece is an example of the “dance theatre” so characteristic of Pina Bausch’s work. In a box-like set of pristine white conceived by Peter Pabst, the dancers interact, crossing paths and following on from each other in violent and burlesque sequences, thus attempting to fill the emptiness of their existences. Situated between tragedy and derision, suffering and hope, the tableaux dovetail into each other, revealing the complexity of the relationships between men and women and the contradictions of human nature. A rare and incisive piece, Two Cigarettes in the Dark raises questions about the theatre of life.

Book
1 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 September 2014 - 2:30PM
Tanztheater Wuppertal

The Tanztheater Wuppertal, which has just celebrated its fortieth anniversary, returns to the stage of the Palais Garnier with Two Cigarettes in the Dark. First performed in 1985 and inspired by the title of a Bing Crosby song evoking solitude and the loss of a loved one, this piece is an example of the “dance theatre” so characteristic of Pina Bausch’s work. In a box-like set of pristine white conceived by Peter Pabst, the dancers interact, crossing paths and following on from each other in violent and burlesque sequences, thus attempting to fill the emptiness of their existences. Situated between tragedy and derision, suffering and hope, the tableaux dovetail into each other, revealing the complexity of the relationships between men and women and the contradictions of human nature. A rare and incisive piece, Two Cigarettes in the Dark raises questions about the theatre of life.

Book
1 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 September 2014 - 2:30PM
Tanztheater Wuppertal

The Tanztheater Wuppertal, which has just celebrated its fortieth anniversary, returns to the stage of the Palais Garnier with Two Cigarettes in the Dark. First performed in 1985 and inspired by the title of a Bing Crosby song evoking solitude and the loss of a loved one, this piece is an example of the “dance theatre” so characteristic of Pina Bausch’s work. In a box-like set of pristine white conceived by Peter Pabst, the dancers interact, crossing paths and following on from each other in violent and burlesque sequences, thus attempting to fill the emptiness of their existences. Situated between tragedy and derision, suffering and hope, the tableaux dovetail into each other, revealing the complexity of the relationships between men and women and the contradictions of human nature. A rare and incisive piece, Two Cigarettes in the Dark raises questions about the theatre of life.

Book
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
8 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 17 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 7 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 October 2014 - 2:30PM
LA TRAVIATA
“Poor Mariette Duplessis is dead... the first woman I ever loved, and now she's in goodness knows which cemetery, abandoned to the maggots of the sepulchre! It's as she said to me fifteen months ago: “I won’t live: I’m a strange girl and I won’t be able to keep living a life I don’t know how to lead and that I don’t know how to bear either. Take me, lead me wherever you want; I won’t bother you, I sleep all day. In the evening, you’ll let me go to the theatre and at night you’ll do with me as you wish!” I’ve never told you of the singular attachment I felt for that charming creature. And now she's dead... And I don’t know what strange old elegy echoes in my heart at her memory.”
Thus spoke Franz Liszt of Marie d’Agoult, the unforgettable ghost of the woman who would become the Dame aux camélias. After Dumas fils, it was Verdi who would give her immortality in his remarkable masterpiece, one of the repertoire’s most striking portraits of a woman, at once cruel and sublime.
10 September 2014 - 8:00PM
Ludwig Van Beethoven (I)

Cycle Ludwig Van Beethoven

The Nine Symphonies


Philippe Jordan Symphony no. 2 in D major, op. 36
Symphony no. 7 in A major, op. 92
Book
13 September 2014 - 4:00PM
Harald Lander ⁄ William Forsythe
Book
19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM
Christian Gerhaher & Gerold Huber

The exceptional Liedersänger, Christian Gerhaher is finally making his debut at the Paris Opera. For this first concert of the 2014-15 Convergences series, Gerhaher, together with his pianist Gerold Huber devotes an entire evening to Goethe and contrasts the visions of Schubert and Wolfgang Rihm. This concert will also mark the French premiere of a great vocal work which the German composer has dedicated to the baritone: Harzreise im Winter, one of Goethe’s most sublime and complex poems, partially set to music by Brahms in his Rhapsody for Contralto.



Settings of poems by Goethe
Franz Schubert Harfenspieler I-III
Wer sich der Einsamkeit ergibt
Wer nie sein Brot mit Tränen aß
An die Türen will ich schleichen
Wolfgang Rihm „Willst du dir ein gut Leben zimmern“
„Worte sind der Seele Bild“
Heut und ewig
Höchste Gunst
Parabase
Aus „Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahren“
Franz Schubert Sehnsucht
Am Flusse
Hoffnung
Schäfers Klagelied
Wonne der Wehmut
An den Mond
Nachtgesang
Der du von dem Himmel bist
Jägers Abendlied

PAUSE

Franz Schubert Prometheus
Mahomets Gesang (extrait)
Ganymed
An Schwager Kronos
Wolfgang Rihm Harzreise im Winter
Franz Schubert Willkommen und Abschied

 

Christian Gerhaher Baritone
Gerold Huber Piano

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

19 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 September 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM
The Barber of Seville

Undoubtedly the most famous opera buffa in the history of music and an eternal source of delight. Rossini composed it in just a few weeks, borrowing the overture and certain airs from his own serious and comic works. All of the remarkable ensembles, however, are original. In the finale of the first act, Rossini combines multiple styles and interlinks duos, trios, quintets and sextets with stupefying virtuosity. Il barbiere di Siviglia was also one of the first operatic triumphs in Europe. The premiere, performed on 20 February 1816 in Rome, was a resounding flop, attended by all of Rossini’s enemies. But the opera was quickly revived on 22 February when “The Barber” received rapturous applause.  And indeed, how could Rossini not have encountered this initial resistance? He pitted the old world (through Bartolo and his authoritarianism) against the new world; old opera against modern opera. With its incredible verve and youthful cheer, this was the work that built Rossini's brilliant international reputation. Manuel Garcia, who originally created the role of Figaro, had the work performed at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in 1819. The opera met with equally huge success in Vienna in 1822, where The Barber" rode roughshod over Weber’s Euryanthe and Schubert’s Fierrabras, and in New York in 1826, where Garcia travelled with his daughter, Maria Malibran.
With this new production of the ever-popular masterpiece, Italian stage director Damiano Michieletto makes his Paris Opera debut.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

20 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 October 2014 - 7:30PM
Lander / Forsythe

Etudes transposes a dance class to the stage. Conceived by Harald Lander who was a choreographer, ballet master and director of the Opera’s Ballet School, this ballet can be seen as a manifesto of classical technique, of its purity, rigour and exactingness. In contrast, two works by William Forsythe, created especially for the Company, shed new light on this academic heritage, deconstructing and reconstructing its vocabulary. In Pas./parts and Woundwork, the choreographer shakes up the codes and boundaries, pushes back the limits and accelerates the pace. Three fundamental works from the repertoire that interact with each other, contributing to the study of the history of a technique which continues to evolve both as an intellectual discipline and as a living art form.

23 September 2014 - 8:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 8:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 8:30PM
Requiem
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Requiem

Southbank Sinfonia
Maîtrise de Notre-Dame De Paris


Lionel Sow
Conductor

 

 

 

 

 

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris
23, 24 septembre

St Martin in the Field Church, Londres
30 septembre

 

Information and booking:
www.musique-sacree-notredamedeparis.fr

23 September 2014 - 8:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 8:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 8:30PM
Requiem
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Requiem

Southbank Sinfonia
Maîtrise de Notre-Dame De Paris


Lionel Sow
Conductor

 

 

 

 

 

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris
23, 24 septembre

St Martin in the Field Church, Londres
30 septembre

 

Information and booking:
www.musique-sacree-notredamedeparis.fr

23 September 2014 - 8:30PM, 24 September 2014 - 8:30PM, 30 September 2014 - 8:30PM
Requiem
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Requiem

Southbank Sinfonia
Maîtrise de Notre-Dame De Paris


Lionel Sow
Conductor

 

 

 

 

 

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris
23, 24 septembre

St Martin in the Field Church, Londres
30 septembre

 

Information and booking:
www.musique-sacree-notredamedeparis.fr

2 October 2014 - 1:00PM
Rencontre avec Brigitte Lefèvre
2 October 2014 - 8:00PM
Carolina Ullrich & Marcelo Amaral

In the Spring of 2013, the Amphithéâtre extended a last-minute invitation to Carolina Ullrich and Marcelo Amaral and the pair enchanted the audience with their brilliant and moving rendition of Schubert. Now, the German-Chilean soprano and the Brazilian pianist return to take on Gabriel Fauré’s rare and mind-blowing Chanson d’Eve, one of the crowning jewels of French song, along with gems from the Spanish repertoire, from Granados to Obradors.



Gabriel Fauré La Chanson d'Ève, op.95 sur des poèmes de Charles van LerbergheParadis
Prima verba
Roses ardentes
Comme Dieu rayonne
L'Aube blanche
Eau vivante
Veilles-tu, ma senteur de soleil?
Dans un parfum de roses blanches
Crépuscule
O mort, poussière d'étoiles
Enrique Granados La Maja y el ruiseñor

Pause

Enrique Granados La Maja Dolorosa
O muerte cruel
Ay majo de mi vida
De aquel majo amante

Elegia eterna
Jesus Guridi Seis canciones castellanas
Allá arriba, en aquella montaña
Sereno!
Llámale con el pañuelo
No quiero tus avellanas
Cómo quieres que adivine!
Mañanita de San Juan
Fernando Obradors Al amor
Del cabello mas sutil
Chiquitita la novia


Carolina Ullrich Soprano
Marcelo Amaral Piano

9 October 2014 - 1:00PM
Concert des Solistes de l'Atelier Lyrique
9 October 2014 - 8:15PM
Nono / Rihm / Jamet

Luigi Nono Cycle

in two parts and two places


Luigi Nono « Hay que caminar… » soñando for two violins
Karlheinz Stockhausen Rotary Quintet for flute, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon

église saint eustache - 6:45pm



Wolfgang Rihm Abgewandt 2 – Musik in memoriam Luigi Nono (3. Versuch) for 14 instruments
Julien Jamet First performance of a new work for ensemble
Commissioned by Ensemble Musikfabrik and the Paris Autumn Festival
Luigi Nono Risonanze erranti, for contralto, flute, tuba, percussion and electronics

Noa Frenkel Contralto
Hannah Weirich, Juditha Haeberlin Violins
Ensemble Musikfabrik
Enno Poppe Conductor

Electronic Studio of the Hochschule for Music and Dance of Cologne (Director Michael beil, technical director Marcel Schmidt)

10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
10 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Tosca

A singer in love, passionate, jealous and impulsive; a romantic painter, an idealist and a defender of liberty; a police chief with a lust for flesh, power and blood, ready to do anything to achieve his ends. Puccini artfully combines the ingredients of a melodrama written for Sarah Bernhardt and comes up with what might be called the opera of operas, a spectacle at once primitive and decadent. In a mythical yet real Rome, from the shadows of the church of Sant' Andrea della Valle to the terrace of Castello Sant' Angelo, passions collide and tear all apart, mingling the erotic with the sacred, love with possession, theatre with life. Nothing is what it seems in Tosca: beautiful women who come to pray are conspirators, defeats are victories and mock executions are real. A spectacular work which captures the essence of opera as few others do.
Pierre Audi signs a new production of this violent and passionate work for the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
11 October 2014 - 4:00PM
Rain ⁄ Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker
BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
14 October 2014 - 8:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 8:30PM
Mahler / Schönberg
Arnold Schönberg Works for piano
Gustav Mahler Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (‘Songs of a Wayfarer’)
Arnold Schönberg Gurrelieder (original version for voices and piano 1900 -1901)

Michaela Kaune Soprano
Janina Baechle Mezzo-soprano
Torsten Kerl Tenor
Marino Formenti Piano

14 October 2014 - 8:30PM, 15 October 2014 - 8:30PM
Mahler / Schönberg
Arnold Schönberg Works for piano
Gustav Mahler Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (‘Songs of a Wayfarer’)
Arnold Schönberg Gurrelieder (original version for voices and piano 1900 -1901)

Michaela Kaune Soprano
Janina Baechle Mezzo-soprano
Torsten Kerl Tenor
Marino Formenti Piano

16 October 2014 - 1:00PM
Rencontre Ballet autour de Rain
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
16 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 22 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 8 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 24 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 29 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 1 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 4 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 15 February 2015 - 2:30PM
The Abduction from the Seraglio
Die Entführung aus dem Serail was the first grand opera in the German language to be constructed as a Singspiel, that typically Germanic theatrical form in which spoken and sung text alternate. At a period when the influence of the Ottoman Empire on its Austrian neighbour lent a certain Turkish flavour to Viennese life, Mozart drew upon the orchestration of Janissary band music to embellish his score, the humanist values of which – the virtues of tolerance and fidelity in love, the celebration of human goodness – prefigure those developed in The Magic Flute and La Clemenza di Tito, his final operatic masterpieces. A metaphor for the combat between Liberty and all forms of absolutism, Belmonte’s quest to deliver Konstanze from Selim’s yoke resounded throughout Europe, inspired at that time by the spirit of the Enlightenment. “All our efforts to express the essence of things came to nothing in the aftermath of Mozart’s appearance. Die Entführung towered above us all”, wrote Goethe, overwhelmed by the composer’s nobleness of spirit and radiant optimism.
BookSelling per unit from 28/08/2014
18 October 2014 - 8:00PM
Schönberg / Brahms
Arnold Schönberg Erwartung, op. 17
Johannes Brahms Symphonie n° 4 en E minor, op. 98

Angela Denoke Soprano

21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 25 October 2014 - 8:00PM, 26 October 2014 - 2:30PM, 28 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 31 October 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 November 2014 - 7:30PM
Rain

With Rain, Anne Teresa de Kersmaeker, a major figure on the choreographic scene,gives us a work of rare intensity and refined purity. The choreographer leads the dancers to transmit the rhythmic pulsations of Music for Eighteen Musicians, by Steve Reich, a quintessential work performed here by the Ensemble Ictus. On stage, music and dance sweep the performers along in a perpetual surge of movement, a dizzying and joyful race which seems to “overflow with life”.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
21 October 2014 - 8:00PM
Jérôme Pernoo

Alone on stage, the magnificent cellist Jérôme Pernoo explores the 20th century repertoire dedicated to the warm and profound voice of the cello:the epic grandeur of Kodaly, the ever incandescent austerity of Hindemith, the distressing lyricism of Britten as well as a work dedicated to the artist by the French composer Guillaume Connesson.


Benjamin Britten Suite n°3 en ut mineur pour violoncelle seul, op. 87
Paul Hindemith Sonate pour violoncelle seul, op. 25 n° 3
Guillaume Connesson Pièce pour violoncelle seul

Pause

Zoltan Kodaly Sonate pour violoncelle seul, op. 8

Jérôme Pernoo Cello
23 October 2014 - 1:00PM
Concert Piazzolla/Scherchen/Kraft/Campo/Reverdy
EXCEPTIONNELLEMENT A L'AMPHITHÉÂTRE

ASTOR PIAZZOLLA Grand Duo pour alto et marimba
TONY SCHERCHEN Yun Yu pour violon et percussions
WILLIAM KRAFT Encounters 10 pour violon et percussions
FRANK CAMPO Canto notturno pour alto et percussions
MICHELE REVERDY Tétramorphie pour alto et percussions

26 October 2014 - 8:00PM
Barber / Mozart / Ravel

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS

BY THE MUSICIANS OF THE PARIS OPERA ORCHESTRA

Samuel Barber Wind Quintet Summer Music, op. 31
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Quintette pour piano et vents, K. 452
Maurice Ravel Le Tombeau de Couperin, by David Walter for wind quintet and piano
30 October 2014 - 1:00PM
Conférence sur Heitor Villa-Lobos
31 October 2014 - 8:00PM
Hommage à Heitor Villa-Lobos
Heitor Villa-Lobos Bachianas Brasileiras n° 1, 4 & 5
Little Suite for cello and piano
Rudepoema

Varduhi Yeritsian Piano
Carolina Ullrich Soprano
Marc Coppey Cello solo

Cello Ensemble

3 November 2014 - 8:00PM
Elisabeth Leonskaja & Jorg Widmann

A summit meeting: a piano legend and a seasoned clarinettist who also happens to be one of the most brilliant composers of our time. Elisabeth Leonskaja, one of the finest performers of Beethoven, Schubert and Brahms will be sharing the stage with Jörg Widmann, a disciple of Wolfgang Rihm, composer of a an already abundant work and a magnificent instrumentalist. Together they will perform the romantic repertoire which has given the clarinet so many marvels, as well as works by the composer-clarinettist.



Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Sonata for clarinet and piano in E flat major
Jörg Widmann Intermezzi for piano
Robert Schumann Fantasiestücke op.73
Jörg Widmann Fantaisie for clarinet solo
Johannes Brahms Sonata for clarinet and piano n°1 in F minor op.120

 

Elisabeth Leonskaja Piano
Jörg Widmann Clarinet

 

6 November 2014 - 8:00PM
Nono / Neuwirth / Pesson / Kurtag / Knox / Holliger / Tamestit

Luigi Nono Cycle

Antoine Tamestit Concert


Luigi Nono Für Paul Dessau (solo tape)
Olga Neuwirth First performance of a new work for viola and tape
commissioned by the Paris Autumn Festival and the Cologne Philharmonic Orchestra
Gérard Pesson Paraphernalia for two violas
György Kurtág Four works for violin and viola
Garth Knox « Sur le chemin de Tolède » (On the road to Toledo): Echoes and Footfalls of Luigi Nono, for viola and viol d’amore (first performance)
Heinz Holliger Trois Esquisses (Three Sketches) for violin and viola
Gérard Tamestit Cante Jondo for viola

Carolin Widmann Violin
Antoine Tamestit, Garth Knox Violas

7 November 2014 - 8:00PM
Ludwig Van Beethoven (II)

Ludwig Van Beethoven Cycle

The Nine Symphonies


Philippe Jordan Symphony no. 1 in C major, op. 21
Symphony no. 3 in E flat major, « Eroica », op. 55
18 November 2014 - 8:00PM
Schönberg / Mantovani
Arnold Schönberg Kammersymphonie, op. 9 (transcription by Webern)
Bruno Mantovani Carnaval, work for clarinet, piano and violin (French premier, commissioned by the Wigmore Hall, London, the Ensemble Intercontemporain and the Paris Opera)
Arnold Schönberg Pierrot Lunaire

Salomé Haller Mezzo-soprano
Soloists from the Ensemble Intercontemporain

20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 14 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Hänsel et Gretel

In 1881, the twenty-seven-year-old Engelbert Humperdinck became Richard Wagner’s assistant in Bayreuth. Wagner had two more years to live. These two years of intense artistic collaboration on Parsifal indelibly marked the young composer’s life and style. In 1883, the Master died, leaving his disciple “incomplete”. He became a wanderer, travelling throughout Europe, eventually becoming a renowned teacher. Ten years later, in Weimar, Humperdinck completed his masterpiece, Hänsel und Gretel. His sister wrote the libretto, inspired by the Grimm brothers’ fairy tale.
The opera premiered at Christmas under the enthusiastic baton of Richard Strauss. Humperdinck had retained a Wagnerian taste for continuous melody and leitmotiv. However, his fairy-tale opera (Märchenoper) also drew on children’s songs and the sort of popular melodies whose origins tend to become lost in the mists of time.
The result is music that astounds, as deep as the lakes of Germanic legends but at the same time strangely familiar. It conjures up memories of our forgotten childhood as though once, long ago, we ourselves were that very brother and sister lost in the forest, trapped in the grasp of the witch with her gingerbread house.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
20 November 2014 - 8:00PM
Angela Denoke & Karola Theill

From Korngold and Janacek to Berg and Shostakovich, Angela Denoke, never fails to leave an indelible impression in her forceful musical portrayals. At the Amphithéâtre, she rediscovers the very essence of music and poetry, from Bist du bei mir—long attributed to Bach—to Strauss and Zemlinsky. She dares to go as far as Brahms’ Four Serious Songs, the composer's last words, which call for more of a prophet than a singer…


BIST DU BEI MIR (Be thou with me)

Johannes Brahms Denn es gehet dem Menschen, wie dem Vieh (Quatre chants sérieux, 1)
Alexander Zemlinsky


In der Ferne
Gute Nacht
Herbsten
Johannes Brahms Ich wandte mich (Quatre chants sérieux, 2)
Richard Strauss Geduld  op.10,5
Johann Sebastian Bach Bist du bei mir BWV 508
Alban Berg Schließe mir die Augen beide (1900)
Johannes Brahms O Tod, wie bitter bist du (Quatre chants sérieux, 3)

Pause

Richard Strauss


Rote Rosen
Die erwachte
Rose Freundliche Vision op.48,1
Johannes Brahms Wie bist du meine Königin op.32,9
Wenn du nur zuweilen lächelst op.57,5
Komm bald op.57,5
Dein blaues Auge op.59,8
Alban Berg Er klagt, dass der Frühling so kortz ist
Das stille Königreich
Fraue, du Süße
Johannes Brahms Wenn ich mit Menschen und mit Engelszungen redete (Quatre chants sérieux, 4)

Angela Denoke Soprano
Karola Theill Piano
22 November 2014 - 8:00PM
Berio / Stockhausen / Macé
Luciano Berio Duetti for two violins (extracts)
Karlheinz Stockhausen Kontakte for piano, percussion and tape
Pierre-Yves Macé Ambidextre for children’s choir, viola and cello,
commissioned by the Paris Autumn Festival and the Ensemble L’Instant Donné

Ensemble l’Instant Donné

The Jean-Philippe Rameau Children’s Choir, Versailles

Christophe Junivart Conductor
Saori Furukawa, Naaman Sluchin Violins
Elsa Balas Viola
Nicolas Carpentier Cello

26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
26 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 November 2014 - 8:00PM, 1 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 16 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 25 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM
Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
29 November 2014 - 7:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 3 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 5 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 7 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 8 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 10 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 12 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 17 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 20 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 22 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 24 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 27 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 29 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 2:30PM, 2 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 4 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 6 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 9 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 11 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 13 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 15 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 18 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 23 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 26 December 2014 - 7:30PM, 28 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 30 December 2014 - 7:30PM
La Bohème

There is perhaps nothing more straightforward than La Bohème: a young man and a young woman meet, fall in love, are separated by life and then reunited again before the ultimate separation. It takes place in Paris, an eternally Bohemian Paris, as legendary as it is real. Out of this simplicity springs something miraculous: an irrepressible and ever-new emotion.  Puccini filled La Bohème with unforgettable images: Mimi, muse-like, entering the poet’s room, a candle in her hand… the lover’s moonlight duet, the brightly-lit grand café, the impossible farewells in the freezing morning, and finally, death on a shabby bed. But these places are just as equally realms within ourselves: his café Momus is the very whirlwind of existence, his Barrière d’Enfer is the frightening barrenness of the heart: La Bohème evokes the things which haunt us all: the love which blazes and transports us to heaven, the fleeting nature of youth, and all-destroying time. In 1896, Puccini still had numerous masterpieces ahead of him. But he would probably never again achieve the clarity and splendour of melody whose every phrase touches us and is engraved in our hearts from the moment we first hear it.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
30 November 2014 - 8:00PM
Herrmann / Barber / Copland / Prokofiev

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS

BY THE MUSICIANS OF THE PARIS OPERA ORCHESTRA

Bernard Herrmann Souvenir de voyage, for clarinet and string quartet
Samuel Barber Dover Beach, for baritone and string quartet
Aaron Copland Sextet for clarinet, piano and strings
Serguei Prokofiev Overture on Jewish themes in C minor
7 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM
Demonstrations

Alongside the annual production, a series of demonstrations, presented in the form of classes, afford an appreciation of the breadth, richness and excellence of this ancestral tradition of dance training.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
7 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM
Demonstrations

Alongside the annual production, a series of demonstrations, presented in the form of classes, afford an appreciation of the breadth, richness and excellence of this ancestral tradition of dance training.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
7 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM
Demonstrations

Alongside the annual production, a series of demonstrations, presented in the form of classes, afford an appreciation of the breadth, richness and excellence of this ancestral tradition of dance training.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
7 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM
Demonstrations

Alongside the annual production, a series of demonstrations, presented in the form of classes, afford an appreciation of the breadth, richness and excellence of this ancestral tradition of dance training.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
7 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 7 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 20 December 2014 - 2:30PM, 21 December 2014 - 10:30AM, 21 December 2014 - 2:30PM
Demonstrations

Alongside the annual production, a series of demonstrations, presented in the form of classes, afford an appreciation of the breadth, richness and excellence of this ancestral tradition of dance training.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
13 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 15 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 16 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 18 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM
Maudits les innocents
BookSelling per unit from 10/09/2014
13 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 15 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 16 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 18 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM
Maudits les innocents
BookSelling per unit from 10/09/2014
13 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 15 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 16 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 18 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM
Maudits les innocents
BookSelling per unit from 10/09/2014
13 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 15 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 16 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 18 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM
Maudits les innocents
BookSelling per unit from 10/09/2014
13 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 15 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 16 December 2014 - 8:00PM, 18 December 2014 - 2:00PM, 19 December 2014 - 8:00PM
Maudits les innocents
BookSelling per unit from 10/09/2014
14 December 2014 - 8:00PM
Ludwig Van Beethoven (III)

Ludwig Van Beethoven Cycle

The Nine Symphonies


Philippe Jordan Symphony no. 4 in B flat major op. 60
Symphony no. 5 in C minor op. 67
21 December 2014 - 8:00PM
Rota / Spohr

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS BY

BY THE MUSICIANS OF THE PARIS OPERA ORCHESTRA

Nino Rota Piccola Offerta musicale for wind quintet
Louis Spohr Nonet in F major, op. 31
Nino Rota Nonetto
31 December 2014 - 7:30PM
New year at the Palais Garnier - La Source

The Persia of legend and fantasy provides the backdrop for the thwarted loves of the hunter Djemil, the beautiful Nouredda, promised to the Khan, and the spirit of the spring, Naila. For his first creation for the Paris Opera Ballet, Etoile Dancer Jean-Guillaume Bart breathes new life into a long neglected work from the repertoire, originally created for the Paris Opera in 1866. The light and colourful score was a joint effort from Ludwig Minkus and Léo Delibes in what was their first ballet composition. The libretto by Arthur Saint-Léon and Charles Nuitter, future composer of Coppélia, draws on Wagnerian romanticism, orientalism and Shakespearean influences and contrasts the real world with that of elves, nymphs and ethereal beings. Working in close collaboration with the dramatist Clément Hervieu-Léger, Jean-Guillaume Bart restores  all its original freshness to La Source. This wonderfully poetic dance tale of astounding virtuosity is further enhanced by Christian Lacroix’s flamboyant costumes and Eric Ruf’s evocative use of space.

BookSelling per unit from 08/09/2014
31 December 2014 - 7:30PM
New Year at the Opéra Bastille - Casse-Noisette

When Tchaikovsky goes back to the realm of childhood, his music becomes suffused with enchantment and nostalgia as well as with nightmarish terrors. The fruit of one such voyage into the land of the imagination was music of incomparable lyricism and originality, evoking a dreamlike and sometimes disturbing world of whirling snowflakes, myriad flowers and dancing sugar plum fairies, and one of his most fabulous masterpieces.
On Christmas Eve, young Clara is given a wooden nutcracker shaped like a little man, which she clutches in her arms before sinking into a deep sleep. She then plunges into a strange dream in which lead soldiers, rats and bats do battle with each other. Guided by her little wooden hussar, now turned into prince charming, Clara overcomes the fears and doubts attendant on her new and previously unknown feelings. In Rudolf Nureyev’s version, this light-hearted tale becomes an initiatory epic. The Nutcracker brings the Company and the pupils of the Ballet School together in a veritable display of bravura. 

BookSelling per unit from 15/09/2014
6 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Swedish Royal Ballet

This year the Paris Opera hosts one of the oldest dance companies in Europe. Founded in 1773 by King Gustav III, the Royal Ballet of Sweden, which is currently directed by Johannes Ohman, brings us a new production created for the company’s 240th anniversary by the Swedish choreographer, Mats Ek, an important figure in the world of theatre and a giant of contemporary dance. Mats Ek’s reworking of Shakespeare’s tragedy, renamed Juliet and Romeo and inspired by the music of Tchaikovsky, is a personal vision of this mythical story of love confronted by rivalry, family conflicts and the struggle for power.

BookSelling per unit from 07/10/2014
6 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Swedish Royal Ballet

This year the Paris Opera hosts one of the oldest dance companies in Europe. Founded in 1773 by King Gustav III, the Royal Ballet of Sweden, which is currently directed by Johannes Ohman, brings us a new production created for the company’s 240th anniversary by the Swedish choreographer, Mats Ek, an important figure in the world of theatre and a giant of contemporary dance. Mats Ek’s reworking of Shakespeare’s tragedy, renamed Juliet and Romeo and inspired by the music of Tchaikovsky, is a personal vision of this mythical story of love confronted by rivalry, family conflicts and the struggle for power.

BookSelling per unit from 07/10/2014
6 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Swedish Royal Ballet

This year the Paris Opera hosts one of the oldest dance companies in Europe. Founded in 1773 by King Gustav III, the Royal Ballet of Sweden, which is currently directed by Johannes Ohman, brings us a new production created for the company’s 240th anniversary by the Swedish choreographer, Mats Ek, an important figure in the world of theatre and a giant of contemporary dance. Mats Ek’s reworking of Shakespeare’s tragedy, renamed Juliet and Romeo and inspired by the music of Tchaikovsky, is a personal vision of this mythical story of love confronted by rivalry, family conflicts and the struggle for power.

BookSelling per unit from 07/10/2014
6 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Swedish Royal Ballet

This year the Paris Opera hosts one of the oldest dance companies in Europe. Founded in 1773 by King Gustav III, the Royal Ballet of Sweden, which is currently directed by Johannes Ohman, brings us a new production created for the company’s 240th anniversary by the Swedish choreographer, Mats Ek, an important figure in the world of theatre and a giant of contemporary dance. Mats Ek’s reworking of Shakespeare’s tragedy, renamed Juliet and Romeo and inspired by the music of Tchaikovsky, is a personal vision of this mythical story of love confronted by rivalry, family conflicts and the struggle for power.

BookSelling per unit from 07/10/2014
6 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Swedish Royal Ballet

This year the Paris Opera hosts one of the oldest dance companies in Europe. Founded in 1773 by King Gustav III, the Royal Ballet of Sweden, which is currently directed by Johannes Ohman, brings us a new production created for the company’s 240th anniversary by the Swedish choreographer, Mats Ek, an important figure in the world of theatre and a giant of contemporary dance. Mats Ek’s reworking of Shakespeare’s tragedy, renamed Juliet and Romeo and inspired by the music of Tchaikovsky, is a personal vision of this mythical story of love confronted by rivalry, family conflicts and the struggle for power.

BookSelling per unit from 07/10/2014
6 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 7 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 10 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Swedish Royal Ballet

This year the Paris Opera hosts one of the oldest dance companies in Europe. Founded in 1773 by King Gustav III, the Royal Ballet of Sweden, which is currently directed by Johannes Ohman, brings us a new production created for the company’s 240th anniversary by the Swedish choreographer, Mats Ek, an important figure in the world of theatre and a giant of contemporary dance. Mats Ek’s reworking of Shakespeare’s tragedy, renamed Juliet and Romeo and inspired by the music of Tchaikovsky, is a personal vision of this mythical story of love confronted by rivalry, family conflicts and the struggle for power.

BookSelling per unit from 07/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
15 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 23 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 January 2015 - 2:30PM, 28 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 8 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 11 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Don Giovanni

Of the three operas written with Da Ponte, Don Giovanni is indubitably the darkest and the most desperate. All the characters, the seducer and those around him, are possessed by breathless fury. Mozart offers them his most sombre, suspenseful, extreme and yet perfect music. Pierre Jean Jouve evoked it in these terms: "In this inspired work, instinct is capable of such Hysteria, in the strict sense of the term, of such extremes of behaviour, of intoxication and oblivion, of supreme positivism and absolute negativism, that we who have the same tendencies within ourselves, are swept along from sphere to sphere, with no hope of respite, venturing into the sombre regions of the human spirit, without ever leaving the exquisitely gilded frame of perfect, limpid beauty.”
Alain Altinoglu directs this now legendary production by the Austrian director and filmmaker Michael Haneke.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
17 January 2015 - 8:00PM, 18 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Benjamin Britten Canticles

Britten composed these five sublime canticles throughout his career, from 1947 to 1974. They each call for a different vocal and instrumental ensemble, and are sometimes inspired by the Bible or by a poet dear to Britten like Edith Sitwell or T. S. Eliot. All are infused with deeply-moving religious inspiration and focus on the voice of a tenor: Peter Pears who first performed them, and at the Amphitheatre, Cyrille Dubois, a born performer of Britten. He is accompanied by pianist Anne Le Bozec, counter-tenor Xavier Sabata, baritone Stéphane Degout, harpist Emmanuel Ceysson and horn player Vladimir Dubois for an evening of intense spirituality.


Benjamin Britten Cantique I, op. 40 : My Beloved is Mine
Cantique II, op. 52 : Abraham and Isaac
Cantique III, op. 55 : Still Falls the Rain
Cantique IV, op. 86 : Journey of the Magi
Cantique V, op. 89 : The Death of Saint Narcissus
Works for piano and harp

Cyrille Dubois Tenor
Xavier Sabata Counter-tenor
Stéphane Degout Baritone
Anne Le Bozec Piano
Emmanuel Ceysson Harp
Vladimir Dubois Horn

17 January 2015 - 8:00PM, 18 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Benjamin Britten Canticles

Britten composed these five sublime canticles throughout his career, from 1947 to 1974. They each call for a different vocal and instrumental ensemble, and are sometimes inspired by the Bible or by a poet dear to Britten like Edith Sitwell or T. S. Eliot. All are infused with deeply-moving religious inspiration and focus on the voice of a tenor: Peter Pears who first performed them, and at the Amphitheatre, Cyrille Dubois, a born performer of Britten. He is accompanied by pianist Anne Le Bozec, counter-tenor Xavier Sabata, baritone Stéphane Degout, harpist Emmanuel Ceysson and horn player Vladimir Dubois for an evening of intense spirituality.


Benjamin Britten Cantique I, op. 40 : My Beloved is Mine
Cantique II, op. 52 : Abraham and Isaac
Cantique III, op. 55 : Still Falls the Rain
Cantique IV, op. 86 : Journey of the Magi
Cantique V, op. 89 : The Death of Saint Narcissus
Works for piano and harp

Cyrille Dubois Tenor
Xavier Sabata Counter-tenor
Stéphane Degout Baritone
Anne Le Bozec Piano
Emmanuel Ceysson Harp
Vladimir Dubois Horn

18 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Beethoven / Schubert

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS

BY THE MUSICIANS OF THE PARIS OPERA ORCHESTRA

Ludwig Van Beethoven Sextet for two horns and strings, op. 81b
Franz Schubert String Quintet in C major D. 956
22 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 31 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 17 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Ariane à Naxos

"Music is a sacred art, gathering the wildest follies like cherubim around a gleaming throne!" Such is the Composer's article of faith, vehemently proclaimed at the end of the Prologue of Ariadne auf Naxos. And boldness is hardly lacking in Strauss and Hofmannsthal's masterpiece, consisting of a long prologue that shows the process of artistic creation at work followed by a one-act opera in which the serious and the comic mingle with heady freedom. More than an illustration of the mixing of styles, Ariadne auf Naxos is its radiant embodiment. Displaying their poetic art, Hofmannsthal and Strauss also offer us a cast of unforgettable characters: the young, idealistic and amorous Composer, brother of both Mozart and Wagner; the luminous Zerbinetta, with her breathtaking coloratura originating in a peal of laughter; and the noble Ariadne, a character from lyric tragedy singing to the stars but shown in the Prologue in the less flattering but so very amusing guise of a capricious diva. The world is a delightful hotch-potch to which it is art's job to bring order, though art cannot and will not smooth its rough edges or resolve its intractable contradictions. One of the pinnacles of 20th century opera and Karita Mattila's eagerly-awaited return to the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
22 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 31 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 17 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Ariane à Naxos

"Music is a sacred art, gathering the wildest follies like cherubim around a gleaming throne!" Such is the Composer's article of faith, vehemently proclaimed at the end of the Prologue of Ariadne auf Naxos. And boldness is hardly lacking in Strauss and Hofmannsthal's masterpiece, consisting of a long prologue that shows the process of artistic creation at work followed by a one-act opera in which the serious and the comic mingle with heady freedom. More than an illustration of the mixing of styles, Ariadne auf Naxos is its radiant embodiment. Displaying their poetic art, Hofmannsthal and Strauss also offer us a cast of unforgettable characters: the young, idealistic and amorous Composer, brother of both Mozart and Wagner; the luminous Zerbinetta, with her breathtaking coloratura originating in a peal of laughter; and the noble Ariadne, a character from lyric tragedy singing to the stars but shown in the Prologue in the less flattering but so very amusing guise of a capricious diva. The world is a delightful hotch-potch to which it is art's job to bring order, though art cannot and will not smooth its rough edges or resolve its intractable contradictions. One of the pinnacles of 20th century opera and Karita Mattila's eagerly-awaited return to the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
22 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 31 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 17 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Ariane à Naxos

"Music is a sacred art, gathering the wildest follies like cherubim around a gleaming throne!" Such is the Composer's article of faith, vehemently proclaimed at the end of the Prologue of Ariadne auf Naxos. And boldness is hardly lacking in Strauss and Hofmannsthal's masterpiece, consisting of a long prologue that shows the process of artistic creation at work followed by a one-act opera in which the serious and the comic mingle with heady freedom. More than an illustration of the mixing of styles, Ariadne auf Naxos is its radiant embodiment. Displaying their poetic art, Hofmannsthal and Strauss also offer us a cast of unforgettable characters: the young, idealistic and amorous Composer, brother of both Mozart and Wagner; the luminous Zerbinetta, with her breathtaking coloratura originating in a peal of laughter; and the noble Ariadne, a character from lyric tragedy singing to the stars but shown in the Prologue in the less flattering but so very amusing guise of a capricious diva. The world is a delightful hotch-potch to which it is art's job to bring order, though art cannot and will not smooth its rough edges or resolve its intractable contradictions. One of the pinnacles of 20th century opera and Karita Mattila's eagerly-awaited return to the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
22 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 31 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 17 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Ariane à Naxos

"Music is a sacred art, gathering the wildest follies like cherubim around a gleaming throne!" Such is the Composer's article of faith, vehemently proclaimed at the end of the Prologue of Ariadne auf Naxos. And boldness is hardly lacking in Strauss and Hofmannsthal's masterpiece, consisting of a long prologue that shows the process of artistic creation at work followed by a one-act opera in which the serious and the comic mingle with heady freedom. More than an illustration of the mixing of styles, Ariadne auf Naxos is its radiant embodiment. Displaying their poetic art, Hofmannsthal and Strauss also offer us a cast of unforgettable characters: the young, idealistic and amorous Composer, brother of both Mozart and Wagner; the luminous Zerbinetta, with her breathtaking coloratura originating in a peal of laughter; and the noble Ariadne, a character from lyric tragedy singing to the stars but shown in the Prologue in the less flattering but so very amusing guise of a capricious diva. The world is a delightful hotch-potch to which it is art's job to bring order, though art cannot and will not smooth its rough edges or resolve its intractable contradictions. One of the pinnacles of 20th century opera and Karita Mattila's eagerly-awaited return to the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
22 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 31 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 17 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Ariane à Naxos

"Music is a sacred art, gathering the wildest follies like cherubim around a gleaming throne!" Such is the Composer's article of faith, vehemently proclaimed at the end of the Prologue of Ariadne auf Naxos. And boldness is hardly lacking in Strauss and Hofmannsthal's masterpiece, consisting of a long prologue that shows the process of artistic creation at work followed by a one-act opera in which the serious and the comic mingle with heady freedom. More than an illustration of the mixing of styles, Ariadne auf Naxos is its radiant embodiment. Displaying their poetic art, Hofmannsthal and Strauss also offer us a cast of unforgettable characters: the young, idealistic and amorous Composer, brother of both Mozart and Wagner; the luminous Zerbinetta, with her breathtaking coloratura originating in a peal of laughter; and the noble Ariadne, a character from lyric tragedy singing to the stars but shown in the Prologue in the less flattering but so very amusing guise of a capricious diva. The world is a delightful hotch-potch to which it is art's job to bring order, though art cannot and will not smooth its rough edges or resolve its intractable contradictions. One of the pinnacles of 20th century opera and Karita Mattila's eagerly-awaited return to the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
22 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 31 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 17 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Ariane à Naxos

"Music is a sacred art, gathering the wildest follies like cherubim around a gleaming throne!" Such is the Composer's article of faith, vehemently proclaimed at the end of the Prologue of Ariadne auf Naxos. And boldness is hardly lacking in Strauss and Hofmannsthal's masterpiece, consisting of a long prologue that shows the process of artistic creation at work followed by a one-act opera in which the serious and the comic mingle with heady freedom. More than an illustration of the mixing of styles, Ariadne auf Naxos is its radiant embodiment. Displaying their poetic art, Hofmannsthal and Strauss also offer us a cast of unforgettable characters: the young, idealistic and amorous Composer, brother of both Mozart and Wagner; the luminous Zerbinetta, with her breathtaking coloratura originating in a peal of laughter; and the noble Ariadne, a character from lyric tragedy singing to the stars but shown in the Prologue in the less flattering but so very amusing guise of a capricious diva. The world is a delightful hotch-potch to which it is art's job to bring order, though art cannot and will not smooth its rough edges or resolve its intractable contradictions. One of the pinnacles of 20th century opera and Karita Mattila's eagerly-awaited return to the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
22 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 31 January 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 17 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Ariane à Naxos

"Music is a sacred art, gathering the wildest follies like cherubim around a gleaming throne!" Such is the Composer's article of faith, vehemently proclaimed at the end of the Prologue of Ariadne auf Naxos. And boldness is hardly lacking in Strauss and Hofmannsthal's masterpiece, consisting of a long prologue that shows the process of artistic creation at work followed by a one-act opera in which the serious and the comic mingle with heady freedom. More than an illustration of the mixing of styles, Ariadne auf Naxos is its radiant embodiment. Displaying their poetic art, Hofmannsthal and Strauss also offer us a cast of unforgettable characters: the young, idealistic and amorous Composer, brother of both Mozart and Wagner; the luminous Zerbinetta, with her breathtaking coloratura originating in a peal of laughter; and the noble Ariadne, a character from lyric tragedy singing to the stars but shown in the Prologue in the less flattering but so very amusing guise of a capricious diva. The world is a delightful hotch-potch to which it is art's job to bring order, though art cannot and will not smooth its rough edges or resolve its intractable contradictions. One of the pinnacles of 20th century opera and Karita Mattila's eagerly-awaited return to the Paris Opera.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
30 January 2015 - 8:00PM
Norbert Ernst & Kristin Okerlund

Eduard Mörike was one of the most fascinating poets of the 19th century.  A pastor of the Swabian school who led a secluded life, he nonetheless imbued his work with ineffable imagination and lyricism, be it in the evocation of nature or in the expression of feelings. Set to music by Schumann and Brahms, he would finally find his most impassioned bard in Hugo Wolf. In just a matter of months during 1888, Wolf composed 53 lieder to the poems of Mörike, glorifying their poetic splendour and steeping them in a harmony right out of Tristan and Parsifal. Norbert Ernst and Kristin Okerlund have constructed an enchanted path through this incomparable collection, from the boundless lyricism of An eine Äolsharfe to the rediscovered eternity of Gesang Weylas.


Hugo Wolf Mörike Lieder
  1 Der Genesene an die Hoffnung
2 Der Knabe und das Immlein
6 Er ist´s!
8 Begegnung
9 Nimmersatte Liebe
10 Fussreise
11 An eine Äolsharfe
  17 Der Gärtner
18 Zitronenfalter im April
20 Auf eine Christblume
24 In der Frühe
25 Schlafendes Jesukind
27 Zum neuen Jahr

Entracte

  28 Gebet
30 Neue Liebe
31 Wo find ich Trost
32 An die Geliebte
33 Peregrina I
34 Peregrina II
  35 Frage und Antwort
36 Lebe wohl
37 Heimweh
38 Lied vom Winde
39 Denk es o Seele
44 Der Feuerreiter
46 Gesang Weylas

Norbert Ernst Tenor
Kristin Okerlund Piano

31 January 2015 - 4:00PM
The Song of the Earth ⁄ John Neumeier
BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
3 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 14 February 2015 - 8:00PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 20 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Paul / Rigal / Lock

This programme brings together three pieces especially created for the Opera Ballet juxtaposing the artistic visions of three contemporary choreographers all of whom, in their different ways, affirm the musicality of movement. In Répliques, Nicolas Paul constructs his choreography around a sustained dialogue with the rich and contrasted music of Ligeti in a complex and profound exploration of reflections, mirror images and doubles. The set, created by the architect Paul Andreu, is constantly remodelled by effects of lighting and by the choreography, unveiling a subtly refined and mysterious piece.
In AndréAuria, Edouard Lock was inspired by the language of classical dance and points technique to explore new possibilities. Accompanied by the minimalist chord sequences of composer David Lang, Lock challenges the limits of speed and balance, pushing his interpreters almost beyond control, to breaking point. Pierre Rigal, an exceptional artist of the French ballet stage, has been invited to create his first choreography for the Company. An outstanding sportsman and mathematician with a diploma in film studies, Pierre Rigal has also frequented the world of the circus and rubbed shoulders with Hip hop artists, developing a personal language based on rupture and energy. Accompanied by the musician Joan Cambon, who has created music for a number of his works, he draws his dancers into an intrepid and inventive work that explores, through multiple definitions of the word “salut”  the cycle of life and renewal.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
7 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 13 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 16 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 19 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 22 February 2015 - 2:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM
Pelléas et Mélisande

Before discovering Maeterlinck's play, Debussy said of the opera he dreamt of composing: "Music begins when words are powerless to express; music is perfect for the inexpressible; I would like it to seem to come out of the shadows and, at times, to go back, always discreet." Thanks to Maeterlinck's characters, to his highly precise and very vague language, so cruel and so apt, Debussy was able to realise the drama of his dreams. A fateful enchantment holds sway over the castle of Allemonde. No sooner does Golaud find Mélisande in the forest and bring her to the kingdom of his ancestors than they find themselves unable to leave, chained to a place that nevertheless belongs nowhere. The castle is racked by desolation and decay. The park seems to be dying under the weight of invisible darkness. The sun barely manages to break through and cast light on the miraculous yet abandoned fountain which used to heal the eyes of the blind and whose waters appear to be bottomless. From the walls one can see the sea, and, at last, the clear sky. But there are also underground tunnels leading to the centre of the earth, suddenly reminding us that we are forever walking over chasms.
Philippe Jordan once again conducts Robert Wilson's immaculate production.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
8 February 2015 - 8:00PM
Krassimira Stoyanova & Jendrik Springer

Krassimira Stoyanova is one of the greatest sopranos of our times. A magnificent performer of the heroines of Verdi, Mozart and Tchaikovsky, this violinist by training is above all an exceptional musician. It is therefore no surprise that she cultivates all the depth and perfection of recital work. As a prelude to her interpretation of Faust‘s Marguerite, Krassimira Stoyanova will enchant us with songs from Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov…


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky,
Serguey Rachmaninov
Melodies

Songs (programme details to be released at a later date)

Krassimira Stoyanova Soprano
Jendrik Springer Piano

24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe. Invited to create a new choreography for the Opera Ballet, he pursues his exploration of this composer’s work and tackles the grandiose Das Lied von der Erde, translating into dance its emotions and mysteries. Drawing on his own poetic imagination, John Neumeier evokes the fatality and nobility of the human condition, ideas which resonate throughout Mahler’s setting of ancient Chinese poems.

BookSelling per unit from 06/10/2014
24 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 25 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 26 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 27 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 28 February 2015 - 7:30PM, 2 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 3 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 4 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 5 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 6 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 9 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 10 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 11 March 2015 - 7:30PM, 12 March 2015 - 7:30PM
THE SONG OF THE EARTH

John Neumeier has always anchored his work in his profound musicality but it is probably in the music of Gustav Mahler that he has found the most profound echo of his own preoccupations, of his artistic universe.